Obama mocks Trump for saying U.S. elections are "rigged"

WASHINGTON, U.S. - U.S. President Barack Obama, in no uncertain terms, told Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to stop "whining" that the elections were rigged. Speaking ...


• Obama ridicules Trump during a press conference at the White House

• Malik Obama, the U.S. president's half-brother, will cheer for Trump at the Vegas debate

• Trump campaign suggests Obama may have won North Carolina in 2008 due to illegal voting

WASHINGTON, U.S. - U.S. President Barack Obama, in no uncertain terms, told Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to stop "whining" that the elections were rigged.

Speaking at the White House Rose Garden during a joint press conference with Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, Obama said, “I’d invite Mr. Trump to stop whining and go try to make his case to get votes.”

“I have never seen, in my lifetime or in modern political history, any presidential candidate trying to discredit the elections and the election process before votes have even taken place. It’s unprecedented. It happens to be based on no facts,” he went on to add.

Mocking Trump's claims that the democratic process was being undermined, the president said the Republican nominee's attitude proves that "if you start whining before the game is even over, if whenever things are going badly for you and you lose you start blaming somebody else, then you don’t have what it takes to be in this job.”

FBI Director James Comey agreed with Obama that it would be difficult to rig the election, saying that the advantage of the U.S. voting system is how outdated and spread out it is. “The beauty of the American voting system is that it is dispersed among the 50 states, and it is clunky as heck,” Comey stated, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Trump, however, chose to ignore Obama's advice and repeated the claims once again in Colorado Springs. 

“Voter fraud is all too common, and then they criticise us for saying that. But take a look at Philadelphia, what’s been going on, take a look at Chicago, take a look at St. Louis. Take a look at some of these cities, where you see things happening that are horrendous.”

“And if you talk about it, they say bad things about you, they call you a racist,” Trump added. 

Referring to the polls ahead of the elections on November 8, which saw Hillary Clinton has the edge, this was Trump's message, “Even though we're doing pretty good in the polls, I don't believe the polls anymore.”

Meanwhile, according to reports, President Obama's brother – an American citizen who lives in Washington, DC, when he’s not in Kenya - Malik Obama, will be backing the Republican nominee at the third and final debate on Wednesday night in Las Vegas, according to reports. 

Malik has been critical of Hillary Clinton's performance as secretary of state and is not too pleased with his brother's work as president. He also agreed with Trump that the mainstream media was biased, and dismissed the women who claimed Trump kissed or groped them without their permission.

“I don’t believe them,” Malik said. “Why didn’t they come forward before?”

And in more claims from the Trump campaign, senior advisor Boris Epshteyn suggested, “Barack Obama may have won North Carolina in 2008 due to illegal voting,” citing a two-year-old highly contested blog post, echoing what Trump had said at a speech earlier. 

There’s no credible evidence backing the Trump campaign's claim, and it appears to be another desperate attempt to shift the focus from the Republic nominee's controversies that have been under the scanner recently. Additionally, President Obama would have won the 2008 election even without North Carolina.

 

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