FBI claims hate crimes against Muslims hits highest mark since 2001 as protesters continue in pockets of America

WASHINGTON, U.S. - According to latest statistics released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation - it’s annual hate crime report, a sharp increase has been reported in the number of hate ...


• Students lead anti-Trump protests, FBI statistics reveal hate crimes on the rise

• In one year, anti-Muslim hate crimes in the United States rose 67 percent

• This is the highest number since the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001

WASHINGTON, U.S. - According to latest statistics released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation - it’s annual hate crime report, a sharp increase has been reported in the number of hate crimes nationwide, with Muslims most often targeted.

The Hate Crime Statistics report, which contains data from 14,997 law enforcement agencies, reveals 5,850 criminal incidents and 6,885 related offenses that were motivated by bias against race, ethnicity, ancestry, religion, sexual orientation, disability, gender, and gender identity.

This was an increase of 6.7 percent from the 5,479 incidents in 2014.

The total is far lower than the numbers seen in the early 2000s, but the report comes at a time of heightened tensions following last week’s presidential election.

In one year, anti-Muslim hate crimes in the United States rose 67 percent, from 154 incidents in 2014 to 257 in 2015, according to the report released this week. 

This is the highest number since the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, when the number of reported hate crimes against Muslims peaked at 481.

Hate crimes can particularly have a devastating impact upon the communities where they occur, which is one of the reasons why the investigation of hate crimes that fall under federal jurisdiction is the number one priority under the FBI’s civil rights program.

Law enforcement agencies submit incident reports annually; the reports include information detailing the offenses, victims, offenders and locations of hate crimes.

The report recorded 5,818 “single-bias” incidents, incidents in which one or more offense types are motivated by the same bias. 

Of those, 59.2 percent were motivated by a racial, ethnic and/or ancestry bias; 19.7 percent by a religious bias; 17.7 percent by a sexual orientation bias; and 3.3 percent by a gender identity, disability or gender bias.

Anti-Jewish hate crimes rose nine percent, anti-black hate crimes went up by almost eight percent, and anti-LGBT hate crimes increased by nearly five percent, while anti-Latino hate crimes remained steady.

The most recent reporting covers calendar year 2015, which included the terror attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, California, as well as Republican Donald Trump’s call for a ban on all Muslims entering the U.S. 

All of those, however, did not occur until the final two months of the year.

It’s not yet known whether Trump plans to implement such a ban now that he has won the presidency. 

Critics said his pledge contributed to anti-Muslim sentiment, along with the recent terrorist attacks across the world.

Students lead protests

High school and middle school students led the charge on Monday as protests against Donald Trump continued for the sixth day.

Hundreds of teens, many not even old enough to vote, joined the protest movement that has seen tens of thousands taking to the streets in U.S. cities following the unexpected election result. 

Monday's protests happened in Los Angeles, Denver, Portland in Oregon, and Silver Spring in Maryland, among others.

Teens from public and private schools in Seattle chanted "We reject the president-elect," as they marched in the streets of the Capitol Hill and downtown neighborhoods. Many waved signs that read "Not My President" or "Love Wins."

Hundreds of high school students also held a walkout in East Los Angeles, California, a diverse neighborhood with a large Hispanic population, demanding protection for the people they said were being targeted by Trump's supporters in the wake of his election.

Churches vandalized

Churches are being vandalized with what appears to be pro-Trump racist graffiti.

The words "Trump nation, Whites only" were found scribbled across a banner advertising Spanish-language services at a Maryland church.

"The president-elect and those who voted for him (must) separate themselves from acts of violence and hate that are being perpetrated in his name," Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington said in a statement. 

In Bean Blossom, Indiana, a swastika and the messages “Heil Trump” and “fag church” were spray-painted on St. David’s Episcopal Church. 

The Episcopal Church is open to LGBT members.

A week before the presidential election, a black church in Mississippi was burned and vandalized with the message “Vote Trump,” prompting a flood of donations.

 

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